Then and Now – Nanortalik

…and somewhere to sit

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In 1971 Nanortalik was a delightful little town – except that we spent three weeks there waiting for the ship with our food and equipment to penetrate the dense coastal pack ice. We had expected to be there for perhaps three days. But we made do. We ate the construction canteen out of food. We moved into an empty house. We got jobs mixing cement. We had philosophical discussions late into the night. And we walked all over the island constructing an elaborate decimal hill-identifying scheme that started with Hills 1, 2 and 3 and proceeded to Hill 1.5 and Hill 1.75 etc.

One of the best viewpoints was located at this boulder on Hill 1, looking across to Sermersoq Island.   In 2016 what appears to be the same boulder appears in a post from our Arctic Adventures guide Ida Nordkvist Permin.

Ida-Nanortalik-2016sm 800

(The earlier Then and Now – Coastal Transport, has also been updated with 2017 information)

IGW

Last Boat from Taserssuaq

August 26th 1971

A few months ago while searching for something (I no longer remember what!) in a cupboard an old manila envelope fell from a book. Unfortunately the envelope was not full of Scottish pound notes my ancestors had hidden from the taxman. However it did contain some ancient “treasure” – long- forgotten black and white negatives of our Greenland 1971 Expedition. The above image of The Last Boat from Taserssuaq –August 26 1971 was the most interesting and I thought it should be shared. It would make an effective “How Not To Go Boating” poster for the Health and Safety Executive of the United Kingdom. Have you ever seen happier pirates? Why are they so happy?

Because the photographer had asked them to smile?

Because they were going home?

Perhaps they can tell us.

Suggestions please….

RAM

50 years have gone by…

A reunion of members of the 1967 expedition

Five members of the 1967 West Greenland Expedition held a fifty-year reunion on 21-23 September 2017 at a delectable wooden cabin in Glen Feshie.  They were Alan Robertson, Roger Nisbet, Bill Band, David Meldrum, and Phil Gribbon : Alan North sent best wishes and some pics to project.  Missing members were John Hall who has been untraceable for years, while Wilf Tauber tragically drowned in a climbing accident at Anglesey in 1971.  Nisbet and North are dwellers in USA and it was good to have their support. Continue reading “50 years have gone by…”

Some books make memories…

…and what I’m reading now

Reading What Makes a Mountain Beautiful?,  reminded me that my expedition diary contained an annotated list of the books I  had read.  The list reveals that among the books outside the light fiction category, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s First Circle got a rave review – though I remember nothing of it. Also, rated “good in patches”, was Gog by Andrew Sinclair and Bram Stoker’s Dracula was enjoyed. Aldoux Huxley’s Brave New World didn’t fare so well getting a comment of  “interesting rubbish”! Payment Deferred by C S Forrester was recorded as “disappointing”. Continue reading “Some books make memories…”

What Makes a Mountain Beautiful?

Books are essential items for expeditions. I would like to say I remember all the books I read on the expedition but I don’t. Six books are mentioned in my diary. One, “The Poetry and Prose of Gerard Manley Hopkins” was lent to me by John (I think). Gerard Manley Hopkins was a nineteenth century Jesuit poet and the few verses of his that I have read are very seriously religious and uninspiring. However some of his prose interested me. “On The Origin of Beauty: a Platonic Dialogue” being one. I do not recall all the dialogue but I do remember that it began by examining whether a six-leafed chestnut tree fan was more beautiful than a seven-leafed fan. The seven-leafed fan was seen to be more handsome even though it was less symmetrical than the six-leafed. So was beauty some complex mix of symmetry and asymmetry or in more general terms regularity and irregularity? Continue reading “What Makes a Mountain Beautiful?”

Climbing in his sleep….

…or the summit of sartorial statements?

It’s strange what you remember after all these years, especially when it comes to matters of detail. This photo was taken from the summit of Croomble, a peak to the north of the col between Taserssuaq and Kangerdluk inlet.  The view is south-east, towards the Ilua fjord region. Continue reading “Climbing in his sleep….”