Climbing in his sleep….

…or the summit of sartorial statements?

It’s strange what you remember after all these years, especially when it comes to matters of detail. This photo was taken from the summit of Croomble, a peak to the north of the col between Taserssuaq and Kangerdluk inlet.  The view is south-east, towards the Ilua fjord region. Continue reading “Climbing in his sleep….”

Even earlier tales from Tasermiut!

An account from the 1960 expedition

We are delighted to include this guest contribution from Ian Wasson and Colin Martin of the 1960 expedition, which starts with their image of Nalumasortoq.

nalumasortoq-r

The pack-ice was unusually bad around South Greenland that year and had caused us long delays in reaching it. Travelling by sea from Copenhagen our ship, the Disko, had been holed below the water-line, Titanic-like, off Cape Farewell. The crew managed to apply a canvas patch and we made our slow way to Narsaq with a severe list. Continue reading “Even earlier tales from Tasermiut!”

Down with Phriss

– on the middle of the three peaks south of Kangerdluk inlet

We were on top of our mountain. It was nameless and unsung. When we got back down at camp we could play around with ludicrous names, and rack our idle minds with playful possibilities. If for a brief imaginary moment it was our mountain then we could merge our names to call it Phriss. Continue reading “Down with Phriss”

Rubicon

The view was worth the effort…

We awoke late.  Nevertheless we went ahead with our attempt to climb Rubicon (1,700m) – a mountain forming part of the east flank of the Qinguadalen valley.  It was a beautiful day; a cloudless azure sky, a bright sun and no wind.  However such a day is not altogether perfect.  In the valley a myriad of mosquitoes and black flies took advantage of the fine weather and attacked us relentlessly.  Once above biting insect level at around 500m, we breathed a sigh of relief. Continue reading “Rubicon”

Alpentop

Cardinal was one of the longest days I’d ever had….

looking down Qinguadalen from Alpentop

….but it wasn’t as long as our day on Alpentop. This wasn’t such a big mountain, but our route was much harder and more hazardous.  There was a vile, greasy, Hard-Severe pitch on it – just as well John was with us – all the scrambling was loose and dangerous (one simply got used to scrambling up rotten pitches of Diff rock unroped) and we were late at the summit.  I recall our bivouac ledge:  sitting on a sheet of ice on ropes which ever so slowly slid away under our cold backsides. Continue reading “Alpentop”

The Cardinal

The Qinguadalen peaks made an early impression…

Cardinal at the head of Qinguadalen

Although I had seen big mountains in the Eastern Alps, the Cardinal of Qinguadalen was by far the most impressive peak I had ever set eyes on.  It seemed incredible that we were planning to climb it.  I couldn’t see how this might be achieved.  We spent a day in reconnaissance.  Bob and Richard went one way, John and I another. Continue reading “The Cardinal”

An unforgettable view

The picture was taken on 21st August 1971.  Well, two pictures really, stitched together some 40 years later from the scanned slides.  Bad weather had recently left a dusting of snow on the tops and good weather had helped spur us back into action.  We had little idea of what was ahead as we left our bivouac among the boulders on the north shore of Taserssuaq.  It was a fine day and easy ascending of grassy slopes, scree and snowfield led to a summit that overhung the glacier below.  There were four of us and and we were the first people to gain this amazing view – for this was the first ascent.  We lingered long, absorbing the incredible view – reluctant to leave this amazing sight of the ice cap flowing into Tasermiut and the dramatic rock walls of Imaha and Pingasuit.  Detailed memories of the ascent have faded but the view from the summit was unforgettable.

RAS