Qinguadalen

The creative juices of our bloggers have temporarily dried up – meanwhile, here are a couple of pages from the book.

Advertisements

q1q2

Rubicon

The view was worth the effort…

We awoke late.  Nevertheless we went ahead with our attempt to climb Rubicon (1,700m) – a mountain forming part of the east flank of the Qinguadalen valley.  It was a beautiful day; a cloudless azure sky, a bright sun and no wind.  However such a day is not altogether perfect.  In the valley a myriad of mosquitoes and black flies took advantage of the fine weather and attacked us relentlessly.  Once above biting insect level at around 500m, we breathed a sigh of relief. Continue reading “Rubicon”

Alpentop

Cardinal was one of the longest days I’d ever had….

looking down Qinguadalen from Alpentop

….but it wasn’t as long as our day on Alpentop. This wasn’t such a big mountain, but our route was much harder and more hazardous.  There was a vile, greasy, Hard-Severe pitch on it – just as well John was with us – all the scrambling was loose and dangerous (one simply got used to scrambling up rotten pitches of Diff rock unroped) and we were late at the summit.  I recall our bivouac ledge:  sitting on a sheet of ice on ropes which ever so slowly slid away under our cold backsides. Continue reading “Alpentop”

The Cardinal

The Qinguadalen peaks made an early impression…

Cardinal at the head of Qinguadalen

Although I had seen big mountains in the Eastern Alps, the Cardinal of Qinguadalen was by far the most impressive peak I had ever set eyes on.  It seemed incredible that we were planning to climb it.  I couldn’t see how this might be achieved.  We spent a day in reconnaissance.  Bob and Richard went one way, John and I another. Continue reading “The Cardinal”